Saturday, 25 October 2014

Monthly Archives October 2011

The Incredible Morphing Fed

Posted by Tyler Watts
October 30, 2011

Student blogger Andrew Mack points out that the Fed was a creature of the “progressive” ethos of the early 20th century—i.e. the idea that powerful centralized institutions could “manage” the economy better than free, competitive individuals. But it is nonetheless interesting to note that when the Fed was founded, it was very different, and much […]

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Two Masterpieces by Mises

Posted by Gonzalo Schwarz
October 30, 2011

In symposiums written “in honor of” some distinguished writer, the individual contributors too often go off on tangents of their own, and develop points of view that may be irrelevant or even alien to the writer they are supposed to honor. In order to pay homage to the great contribution of Ludwig von Mises in […]

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FEDERAL RESERVE ESSAY CONTEST

Posted by Gonzalo Schwarz
October 30, 2011

The Foundation for Economic Education is proud to announce the 2011 Eugene S. Thorpe Writing Competition. Writers of all ages are invited to address the following: “Should the Federal Reserve be abolished? What monetary system should replace it?” Deadline: Midnight, Dec. 31, 2011 Length: 2,000 words. No footnotes or endnotes. Email Word file to: essaycontest@fee.org (One entry […]

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America’s Love/Hate Relationship with Sound Money

Posted by Tyler Watts
October 28, 2011

Having been doing research for a paper on credit expansion and inflation in the U.S. in the 1790’s, I’ve been looking at mortgage documents from that era. Almost all of them feature what we might call a “sound money clause” i.e. they are explicitly payable in “gold or silver coin.” One particular mortgage note from […]

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