Friday, 19 January 2018

Author Archives Henry Boateng

The Eurozone’s Coming Inflation Divide

Posted by Henry Boateng
April 20, 2011
in Blog

“So now – for once – it is the German economy that is bound for higher inflation than the rest of Europe. And make no mistake about whether rising prices will feed through to wage growth. Already, barely a year into the recovery from the worst economic crisis since World War II, unemployment in Germany […]

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Me, Obama, Standard and Poor’s and Popcorn

Posted by Henry Boateng
April 19, 2011
in Blog

For the past few months I have been really disturbed about this nation’s fiscal challenges. With a $14 trillion structural deficit, and a $1.6 trillion deficit for this fiscal year alone, I think people should be concerned—I mean really concerned. So when I heard that the president was going to propose a plan to reduce […]

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So Where Do We Go From Here?

Posted by Henry Boateng
April 14, 2011
in Blog

Last week, in my blog, I discussed my concerns regarding the policies that the Federal Reserve has been pursuing lately. My concern was that in its attempt to achieve maximum employment, it might lose its grip on both of its mandates: price stability and maximum employment. Because reserves (or the monetary base), as things stand […]

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A Cure for Fiscal Failure?

Posted by Henry Boateng
April 12, 2011
in Blog

“In a new paper, “A Decade of Debt,” Carmen M. Reinhart and I show that general government debt in the United States, including federal, state, and local debt, has now surpassed the record 120% of GDP reached at the end of World War II.” “Japan, of course, is in even worse shape, with government debt […]

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Asia’s Inflation Trap

Posted by Henry Boateng
April 12, 2011
in Blog

“The lessons of earlier battles against inflation are clear on one fundamental point: inflationary pressures cannot be contained by negative, or slightly positive, real short-term interest rates. The only effective anti-inflation strategy entails aggressive monetary tightening that takes policy rates into the restrictive zone. The longer this is deferred, the more wrenching the ultimate policy […]

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Saying Goodbye to Price Stability

Posted by Henry Boateng
April 5, 2011
in Blog

America’s monetary policy has been going rogue ever since the Great Recession began. Mr. Bernanke, a man, whose position I by no means envy, has taken certain unprecedented steps, since the crisis, with the aim of helping get America’s economy back on track. I do not doubt Mr. Bernanke’s intentions (I know he means well); […]

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