Saturday, 19 August 2017

Blog

Blogging by friends of Atlas and others who concerned with the issues at hand.

Knowledge Problem in Central Banking – Part II

August 3, 2017

The previous post presented Hayek’s knowledge problem in the context of the economic calculation debate under socialism. We discussed the distinction (sometimes overlooked) between information and knowledge . To sum up, information is objective data such as quantities and prices. As a qualitative concept, information can be complete or incomplete. Knowledge is subjective data interpretation. As a qualitative concept, […]

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Knowledge Problem in Central Banking – Part I

August 2, 2017

In my previous posts, Andreas Hoffmann and I discussed the problem of unintended consequences in monetary policy, particularly as applied to the U.S. Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank in the context of the 2008 crisis. This post tackles a related issue: the so called “knowledge problem.” This term was coined after Hayek’s engagement […]

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The Inflation Tax

Posted by Jerry Jordan
July 20, 2017

Can you name an official at a major central bank who expresses worries that inflation is now, or soon will be, too high?  Can you identify any financial publication–even the Wall Street Journal–that does not report that recent inflation data have been “disappointing?” To paraphrase former President Nixon, are we “all inflationists now?” Twenty years […]

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The Regression Theorem: In Light of Bitcoin

July 18, 2017

In three previous posts, I have described the regression theorem, discussed its practical applications, and considered some misconceptions. In this post, I will consider the regression theorem in light of bitcoin. The discussion around bitcoin and the regression theorem usually focuses on whether bitcoin has some intrinsic worth (read: non-monetary use). If bitcoin is intrinsically […]

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Unintended Monetary Policy Effects – Tale II: ECB Crisis Policies

July 16, 2017

The Federal Reserve’s (Fed) and European Central Bank’s (ECB) policy responses to the recent financial disasters offer two tales of unintended consequences. Our previous post outlined the undesired effects of the Fed’s policies. In this post, we suggest that the ECB’s stabilization policies did not only fail to achieve its goals. Monetary policy has also […]

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The Regression Theorem: Misconceptions

July 13, 2017

In two previous posts, I described the regression theorem and discussed its practical applications. In this post, I will discuss some misconceptions. Misconception 1. The regression theorem only applies to a barter economy. In a recent article, Laura Davidson and Walter Block argue that the regression theorem is only applicable in a barter economy. It […]

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