Saturday, 18 November 2017

fiscal

Europe’s Bank Money Blues

Posted by Gonzalo Schwarz
November 22, 2013
in Blog

By Steve Hanke   Well, it’s official, the economic talking- head establishment has declared war on Germany. The opening shots in this battle were fired by none other than the United States Treasury Department, which had the audacity to blame Germany for a weak Euro- zone recovery in its semi-annual foreign exchange report. The Treasury’s […]

Read More

“Après moi le deluge”

Posted by Alex Chafuen
December 31, 2012
in Blog

by Alex Chafuen During a recent interview on NTN24TV,  I was asked about the difference between the fiscal deficit and the fiscal “cliff.”  I told them that the deficit is more like a flood (deluge), and that explanation led me to write an op-ed for Investors Business Daily, thanks Daniel Bunn for co-writing. We begin: […]

Read More

The Euro’s Fetters?

Posted by Gonzalo Schwarz
July 9, 2012
in Blog

Is the Euro harder to escape than the Gold Standard? by Gonzalo Schwarz Spanish economist Jesús Huerta de Soto just published a new article entitled “An Austrian Defense of the Euro.” In this paper Huerta de Soto develops an argument based on the lectures given by Nobel laureate Friedrich Hayek in the 1930’s at the […]

Read More

Cracks in the Fiscal Dam

Posted by Tyler Watts
March 22, 2012
in Blog

by Tyler Watts I’ll admit it: we fiscal hawks are increasingly mystified that things haven’t blown up yet for Uncle Sam. The Fed has held interest rates at zero for almost 3 ½ years now, and the inflation rate hasn’t exploded—even though people are noticing price increases all around, Bernanke & company can still claim […]

Read More

What Does Regime Uncertainty Look Like?

February 1, 2012
in Blog

To follow the development of the Euro crisis it sometimes feels like watching a slow motion movie where we know the final result, but we don’t know how is it going to be played out. News and uncertainty, again, about the future of the Euro and a potential default by Greece is like following the […]

Read More

The Irrelevant Dramatics of the Super Committee

Posted by Tyler Watts
December 2, 2011
in Blog

“Lord, make me chaste, but not yet.”-St. Augustine I know a guy who’s 130 lbs. overweight, slowly dying from arthrosclerosis and diabetes. He’s been living a slouchy lifestyle for the past 10 years: fast food every night, hasn’t seen the inside of a gym since high school, smokes a pack a day. His doctors have […]

Read More

Checkmate?

August 10, 2011
in Blog

The turmoils affecting the economics and financial markets in the United States and Europe do not seem to go away as fast as anyone would want to. Those who warned that this may be a crisis with a “W” shape may well be right. The recent downgrade in from AAA to AA- in the short […]

Read More

The General Assumptions of Policy, Regulation, and Intervention

Posted by Gonzalo Schwarz
July 19, 2011
in Blog

An open letter to a Washington Post columnist. Dear Mr. Klein, Regarding your article in the Washington Post today, “The dangers of misinterpreting Keynes,” I feel it is important to clear up some misunderstandings that have done great damage to the world economy, and especially here in the U.S. It is difficult to refute modern […]

Read More

Budget Reform in Italy

July 14, 2011
in Blog

Italy’s senate approved today a plan to cut government spending for the period 2011-2014. Italy’s public debt is more than 100% of GDP and the fiscal deficit was between 3% to 5.9% of GDP for last year. Similar situation is shared by other European countries like Greece, Spain, Germany, Portugal, Ireland and France. Europe, in […]

Read More

Like fish in a barrel.

Posted by Gonzalo Schwarz
March 22, 2011
in Blog

The most important matter to anyone concerned with expanding freedom by limiting government is the matter of sound money. In fact the definition of sound money boils down to freedom of choice in money. Alternatively, control of the money is the source of a government’s unlimited growth. Any paper constraint can be washed away with […]

Read More

Greenspan Warns of Fiscal Profligacy

June 18, 2010
in Blog

In a Wall Street Journal op-ed, former Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan warns of U.S. fiscal profligacy, in part fuelled by the current low borrowing costs of the government: “Despite the surge in federal debt to the public during the past 18 months—to $8.6 trillion from $5.5 trillion—inflation and long-term interest rates, the typical symptoms of […]

Read More